Sinopsis

The podcast of Connecticut history. A joint production of the State Historian and Connecticut Explored.

Episodios

  • 74. Post WWII: 1949 Travel Diary of Beatrice Auerbach with Congresswoman Chase Woodhouse

    74. Post WWII: 1949 Travel Diary of Beatrice Auerbach with Congresswoman Chase Woodhouse

    01/07/2019 Duración: 40min

    Two of Connecticut’s most influential women, Beatrice Fox Auerbach, the owner of G. Fox, the largest privately-owned department store in the United States at the time and U.S. Congresswoman Chase Going Woodhouse, the second woman to be elected to the US Congress from Connecticut, spent seven weeks travelling through 10 countries in the Middle East and Europe in 1949. Only four years after the end of WWII and one year after the founding of the new nation of Israel, Auerbach and Woodhouse were shown battlefields, refugee camps, and the ruins of German cities. Auerbach’s diary entries reveal what she saw and experienced-civil war in Greece, Arab refugee camps in Transjordan, the value of using Hebrew in Israel, and the fear of rising anti-Semitism and communism in Germany. In this episode, edited from a lecture given at the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Hartford, Dr. Tracey Wilson comments on Auerbach and Woodhouse’s contribution to the development of women in leadership roles in Connecticut and reads fro

  • 73. Dept Stores, G.Fox and the Black Freedom Movement

    73. Dept Stores, G.Fox and the Black Freedom Movement

    17/06/2019 Duración: 36min

    This summer the Connecticut Historical Society is hosting an exhibition called Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow. It’s a traveling show that originated at the New-York Historical Society. The exhibition explores the struggle for full citizenship and racial equality that unfolded after the Civil War. Even though northern states like Connecticut did not institute Jim Crow segregation by law, discrimination and segregation were the norm in many public spaces, including elegant department stores like New York City’s Macy’s, Bloomingdales, and Hartford’s G. Fox. In this episode, Dr. Traci Parker of the University of Massachusetts, with some editorial commentary from host Natalie Belanger talk about what department stores like G. Fox meant to consumers and retail workers alike, and how they become sites of struggle in the civil rights movement.     Dr. Parker’s new book is Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s published by the

  • 72a BONUS EPISODE: Colin Calloway on Dartmouth as a School for Native Americans

    72a BONUS EPISODE: Colin Calloway on Dartmouth as a School for Native Americans

    08/06/2019 Duración: 38min

    BONUS CONTENT: LECTURE ONLY 

  • 72. Samson Occom the Man - Mohegan Elder Beth Regan

    72. "Samson Occom the Man" - Mohegan Elder Beth Regan

    01/06/2019 Duración: 58min

      In Part 2 of our Series Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of the Founding of Dartmouth College and Its Roots in the town of Columbia. Mohegan Elder Beth Regan tells the story of Samson Occom. Occom,  a Mohegan convert to Christianity,  was educated by Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, became a teacher and minister, raised much of the money used to establish Dartmouth, and went on to found the utopian native Christian community of Brothertown, New York. Occom’s story as told by Mohegan elder Regan provides a different and importantperspective on Dartmouth’s founding, one that is not to be missed.   This episode is dedicated to Mohegan Nonner and elder Faith Damon Davison, with whom Regan was to give her talk. She was prevented by the onset of an illness that led to her passing a few weeks later. A wise and wonderful person, Nonner Faith Damon Davison will be missed by all of us who knew her, - 

  • 71 Eleazar Wheelock, The Great Awakening, Samson Occom  the Indian School

    71 Eleazar Wheelock, The Great Awakening, Samson Occom & the Indian School

    15/05/2019 Duración: 01h11min

    Recently, alumni of Dartmouth College, members of the Mohegan nation, the Columbia Historical Society and state and local officials gathered in the quiet corner town of Columbia to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of that Ivy League Institution. Why Columbia? That is where the Great Awakening minister Eleazar Wheelock, inspired by the educational achievements of Mohegan student Samson Occom, founded Moor’s Indian Charity School, the training school for indigenous missionaries that led directly to Wheelock’s founding of Dartmouth in 1769. In this episode, following Elder Beth Regan’s Mohegan-language conference invocation, state historian Walt Woodward describes Eleazar Wheelock’s life as a local minister and Great Awakening evangelist, his relationship with Samson Occom, and life at Moor’s Indian Charity School. “Eleazar Wheelock, the Great Awakening, Samson Occom, and the Indian School -  This episode of Grating the Nutmeg.”

  • 70. Anni and Josef Albers in Connecticut

    70. Anni and Josef Albers in Connecticut

    01/05/2019 Duración: 34min

    This episode celebrates the 100th anniversary of the most influential design school of the twentieth century, the Bauhaus, and Connecticut’s connection to it. Connecticut Explored’s Assistant Publisher Mary Donohue and conceptual artist, photographer and frequent Connecticut Explored contributor Bob Gregson talk about pioneering Modern artists Anni and Josef Albers, who escaped Nazi Germany in the 1930s and made New Haven their home in  1950. It’s a remarkable story. Josef was associated with the Bauhaus longer than any other artist and Anni was the last surviving teacher from the Bauhaus. Both had independent careers as world  famous, influential teachers and artists.     For more information about the Albers, read Bob’s feature story in the Winter 2018-2019 issue of Connecticut Explored at ctexplored.org and for more about the Albers,  go to the Josef & Anni Albers Foundation’s website at albersfoundation.org.  For more about our guest, go to BobGregson.com   This episode was hosted and produced by Mar

  • 69. The Breach: Voices Haunting a New England Mill Town

    69. The Breach: Voices Haunting a New England Mill Town

    15/04/2019 Duración: 45min

                    It’s not very often that a historian interviews a poet for a history podcast, but in this episode state historian Walt Woodward interviews award-winning poet, novelist, essayist, environmentalist, and former Deputy Commission of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection David K. Leff about his   new verse novel, The Breach: Voices Haunting a New England Mill Town (Homebound Books, 2019). The Breach is a fascinating study of decline in  a New England factory village  caught in the throes of both an economic and an environmental crisis. And - plus, plus, plus - it’s a story  told mostly by historical objects. Leff talks about his book,  the reasons he lets objects tell the story, and reads some of the entries, too.   Warning: Leff's readings contain a bit of profanity, one violent episode, and a hint of sex.  

  • 68. Fort Trumbull’s Three Lives

    68. Fort Trumbull’s Three Lives

    29/03/2019 Duración: 22min

    In this podcast cross-over episode,  Johnna Kaplan, author of Connecticut Explored's spring 2019 story about Fort Trumbull in New London, Connecticut is joined by her Going/Steadypodcast co-host Kerri Provost. Listen as they dive into the history of Fort Trumbull, a Connecticut state park that’s seen a devastating Revolutionary War battle, witnessed Prohibition-era high-speed boat chases, and housed a top-secret military research facility. Today Fort Trumbull is one of New London’s must-visit attractions, part of the new Thames River Heritage Park.  Thanks to the co-hosts of Going/Steady, Kerri Provost of Real Hartford and Johnna Kaplan of The Size of Connecticut. Listen to Going/Steady podcast at goingsteadyct.com and on iTunes. For more information about the fort, visit ct.gov/deep and fortfriends.org.  For more about the summer water taxi and historic attractions go to thamesriverheritagepark.org This episode produced by Mary Donohue and engineered by Patrick O’Sullivan. To hear more episodes of Grating t

  • 67. Louis Comfort Tiffany in New London

    67. Louis Comfort Tiffany in New London

    27/02/2019 Duración: 31min

    The story behind this episode started with the high-profile heist in 1991 of a stained-glass window from the nineteenth century mausoleum of a New London industrialist. The window was designed by world-famous artist Louis Comfort Tiffany.  But the thieves hadn’t counted on a persistent detective. Tiffany, best known for his brilliant innovations in glass, had deep Connecticut roots. A new permanent exhibition about his work, including 100 fine- and decorative-arts objects, is now on view at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum in New London. Join host Mary Donohue and curator Tanya Pohrt and museum director Sam Quigley to discover more about Tiffany’s career, his family ties to New London, and his life-long pursuit of beauty. Read our story about Louis Comfort Tiffany in the Winter 2018-2019 issue online at ctexplored.org. For more information about the Lyman Allyn’s exhibition “Louis Comfort Tiffany in New London” and the Lyman Allyn Art Museum visit lymanallyn.org.  To see a fantastic interior designed by Louis Com

  • 66. Sharon Cures: One Small Town of Medical Marvels

    66. Sharon Cures: One Small Town of Medical Marvels

    15/02/2019 Duración: 38min

    Recently, US News and World Report ranked Connecticut 4th best among the 50 states in the quality of our healthcare. We have great research universities and teaching hospitals, and pharma, biotech, and medical engineering companies most states envy. That’s what makes this podcast so surprising. This is the story of how the little Litchfield County hill town of Sharon – with a population of 2700 people – has produced some of our state’s leading medical innovators. And it’s been doing so for centuries.            Join State Historian Walt Woodward on a visit to the Sharon Historical Society where co-curators Susan Shepard and Marge Smith tell us about the breakthroughs in innoculation, immunotherapy, and gender equity in the medical field pioneered by Sharon residents. It’s part of their exhibit “Sharon Cures: Centuries of Medicine in One Small Town”. It’s three stories in one, that will surprise, inform, and make you want to learn more about this town of medical marvels. While you're listening, view an album o

  • 65. Norwalks Village Creek Ahead of Its Time

    65. Norwalk's Village Creek Ahead of Its Time

    01/02/2019 Duración: 25min

    After World War II, one Connecticut community made a conscious effort to reject racial segregation. The founders of Village Creek in Norwalk created a cooperative neighborhood which promised not to discriminate based on "race, color, creed or politics."   Over the next decades, the Villagers faced criticism from many quarters, but the community survived and thrives today. In this episode, Natalie Belanger and Melica Bloom of the Connecticut Historical Society take a look at the founding of Village Creek, and some of the challenges it faced over the decades.    If you'd like to learn more about the Village Creek Association, visit the Connecticut Historical Society's Research Center. And visit their special exhibition, "Patios, Pools and the Invention of the American Backyard," a travelling exhibition by the Smithsonian Institution, on view through February 23, 2019. Find out more at chs.org.   And for more great Connecticut stories, subscribe to Connecticut Explored, the magazine of Connecticut history.

  • 64. Best Winter History Reads

    64. Best Winter History Reads

    13/01/2019 Duración: 58min

         State Historian Walt Woodward asked five of Connecticut's leading voices for the history community, what their favorite winter history reads are this year. Briann Greenfield of the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, State Librarian Ken Wiggin, Sally Whipple of the Old State House, Jason Mancini of CTHumanities, and Christina Volpe of the Connecticut League of History Organizations, each shared the books that are providing them a fascinating escape from bleak midwinter, the 2019 edition.  

  • 63. Why the Constitution of 1818 Matters Today

    63. Why the Constitution of 1818 Matters Today

    18/12/2018 Duración: 43min

    This is the fifth in our series of talks presented by Connecticut’s Old State House commemorating the 300th anniversary of Connecticut’s first state constitution. In this episode judges Henry Cohn and Jon Blue wrap up our discussion of the state’s first constitution in “Why the Constitution of 1818 Matters Today.” This has been a great series pairing historians and legal scholars. In the first in the series, episode 45, state historian Walt Woodward provides the historian’s view of the broader cultural context that brought us to a state constitutional convention. In this episode, Judge Blue gives us the legal perspective. And in episode 55, Wesleyan University professor emeritus Richard Buel does a deep dive into the political history that led to the constitution. Also in this episode, Judge Cohn gives a judge’s perspective on the constitution’s Declaration of Rights-- in particular what it has to say about our right to a jury trial, freedom of religion, and right to an education. For the historian’s perspec

  • 62. Three Centuries of Christmas at the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

    62. Three Centuries of Christmas at the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

    03/12/2018 Duración: 30min

      Charles Lyle, executive director of the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum in Wethersfield, whets your appetite for a visit to the Webb, Stevens, and Deane houses to see how the holidays were celebrated in three eras: c. 1770, c. 1830, and c. 1930. Find out how, in the 1800s, Clement C. Moore and Thomas Nast created Santa Claus, and the origin of the New Year's resolution--all in this episode of Grating the Nutmeg!    This episode is sponsored by attorney Peter Bowman, holding distracted drivers accountable for their actions. Find out more at bowman.legal   For more great holiday listening, listen to episode 21 "A Connecticut Christmas Story by Harriet Beecher Stowe," and episode 11 to learn more about the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum. This episode was produced by Elizabeth Normen, and Patrick O’Sullivan.

  • 61. Feasts, Facts  Fictions : Cooking REAL New England Holiday Foods

    61. Feasts, Facts & Fictions : Cooking REAL New England Holiday Foods

    17/11/2018 Duración: 47min

    Food historians Keith Staveley and Kathleen Fitzgerald join state historian Walt Woodward at his dinner table in Columbia for a talk about traditional New England holiday foods - authentic and not-so-authentic – and the stories behind them.  PLUS, Keith and Kathy brought along 9 truly historic and delicious New England food recipes, translated into modern cooking instructions kitchen-tested for authentic flavor.  Whether you want to wow your holiday dinner guests with some astonishing food facts, or cook up a dish or two they'll be talking about all year, this is your podcast.   Listen to the stories, then DOWNLOAD THE RECIPES AT Connecticut Explored     www.ctexplored.org/historic-holiday-recipes/ This episode is sponsored by attorney Peter Bowman, holding distracted drivers accountable for their actions. Find out more at bowman.legal Don't forget to listen to the special bonus add-on:a live reading  Gov. Samuel Huntington's 1786 Thanksgiving meditation, recorded at the special Thanksgiving dinner at the Sam

  • GTN60. SPECIAL CPTV Audio Documentary: BARNUMS CONNECTICUT

    GTN60. SPECIAL CPTV Audio Documentary: BARNUM'S CONNECTICUT

    02/11/2018 Duración: 45min

    THE P T BARNUM YOU NEVER KNEW   In this special Connecticut Public Television audio documentary, we tell the story almost no one knows about the other side of PT Barnum. Almost everyone is familiar with Barnum's extraordinary career as a showman, entrepreneur, and creator of The Greatest Show on Earth, but "Barnum's Connecticut", which host Walt Woodward wrote and produced as a companion to CPTV's broadcast of the American Experience documentary "The Circus"  CPTV.org/thecircus shows a side of this world-changing impresario that will challenge anything you think about him right now. Featuring Kathy Maher of Bridgeport's Barnum Museum and Sally Whipple of Connecticut's Old State House in Hartford, this is an episode you don't want to miss.      And to hear the companion episode "Barnum's Circus" visit the Connecticut Public Television "The Circus" webpage 

  • 59. Constitution of 1818 Part 4: Milestone in Church State Relations?

    59. Constitution of 1818 Part 4: Milestone in Church State Relations?

    15/10/2018 Duración: 40min

    This episode, the fourth in our 6-part series commemorating the Constitution of 1818, explores one of the main accomplishments of the state’s first constitution: the separation of church and state. Professor Robert Imholt challenges that assertion, though, arguing that the process to disentangle religion from the state began much earlier. Still, find out how deep our Puritan roots were as the state finally convened to write a state constitution in this episode of Grating the Nutmeg. This episode is sponsored by attorney Peter Bowman, holding distracted drivers accountable for their actions. Find out more at bowman.legal

  • 58. Keeping it Clean in World War I

    58. Keeping it Clean in World War I

    01/10/2018 Duración: 31min

    In the 1910s, a group of Connecticut reformers formed a society aimed at solving a growing crisis – the spread of venereal diseases. The United States’ entry into WWI provided this so-called “social hygienist” movement with an unprecedented opportunity to influence the sexual mores of Americans. In this episode produced by Connecticut Historical Society’s Natalie Belanger, Natalie tells us how that worked out for these well-intentioned reformers—especially one George P. Thayer, a crusader for clean living that saw a little more in France than he'd bargained for.   This episode is sponsored by Attorney Peter Bowman. Find out more at bowman.legal. Read more about Connecticut in World War I at ctexplored.org in the Spring 2017 and Winter 2014/2015 issues.   

  • 57. Breaking Golf’s Color Line in Hartford

    57. Breaking Golf’s Color Line in Hartford

    15/09/2018 Duración: 44min

    Hartford native Gerry Peterson has played golf with President Barack Obama and was inducted into the Black Golf Hall of Fame in 2015. Golf has always been a huge part of his life from his start as a kid caddie during the Depression to playing as a young executive at Aetna Life and Casualty. But what did it take for Peterson, a black golfer, to become a member of the whites-only Keney Park Golf Club in 1963? Gerry Peterson will tell us and historian Jeffrey Mainville , author of this summer 2018 issue’s story “The Midway Golf Club” will reveal Hartford’s part in the national struggle to end racial discrimination at municipal golf courses in America. This episode was produced by Mary Donohue, Asst. Publisher of Connecticut Explored and engineered by Patrick O’Sullivan, PDO Films. Subscribe at ctexplored.org For more stories of struggle and triumph by Connecticut’s African American community, order your copy of our book African American Connecticut Explored, now in paperback, on Amazon. This episode was sponsor

  • 56. Constitution of 1818 Part 3: The Constitutional Debates

    56. Constitution of 1818 Part 3: The Constitutional Debates

    31/08/2018 Duración: 34min

    Attorney Wesley Horton, president of the Connecticut Supreme Court Historical Society, outlines the main issues of debate as state delegates finally gather to draft a state constitution. What happened inside the convention? How do we know? Find out in this episode of Grating the Nutmeg. This episode was recorded at Connecticut's Old State House and produced by Elizabeth Normen.    This episode is sponsored by attorney Peter Bowman, holding distracted drivers accountable for their actions. Find out more at bowman.legal. And Connecticut Humanities, co-publisher of Connecticut Explored.    See Episode 45 for Constitution of 1818 Part I Trouble in the Land of Steady Habits See Episode 55 for Constitution of 1818 Part 2 The Collapse of Federalist Dominance   Read More! Buy the special 200th Anniversary of the Constitution of 1818 Fall 2018 issue of Connecticut Explored at ctexplored.org.

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