Speculative Grammarian Podcast

Sinopsis

Speculative Grammarianthe premier scholarly journal featuring research in the neglected field of satirical linguisticsis now available as an arbitrarily irregular audio podcast. Our podcast includes readings of articles from our journal, the occasional musical number or dramatical piece, and our talk show, Language Made Difficult. Language Made Difficult is hosted by the SpecGram LingNerds, and features our signature linguistics quizLies, Damned Lies, and Linguisticsalong with some discussion of recent-ish linguistic news and whatever else amuses us. Outtakes are provided.

Episodios

  • The Encyclopedia of Mytholingual Creatures, Places, and Things—Part II

    The Encyclopedia of Mytholingual Creatures, Places, and Things—Part II

    15/10/2010 Duración: 04min

    The Encyclopedia of Mytholingual Creatures, Places, and Things—Part II; by Jʚsɘph Cɑɱpbɛɬɭ; From Volume CLIX, Number 3 of Speculative Grammarian, July 2010. — Noams: Small, wizened, earth-dwelling mytholingual creatures of Europe and North America. Generators of controversy and vitriolic rhetoric among such detractors as Traskus—Basque-speaking etymological kobolds—who often claim that noams publish “dogmatic”, “half-baked twaddle” on universal mythogrammar, despite the fact that “UM is a huge waste of time.” (Read by Trey Jones.)

  • The Encyclopedia of Mytholingual Creatures, Places, and Things—Part I

    The Encyclopedia of Mytholingual Creatures, Places, and Things—Part I

    15/09/2010 Duración: 05min

    The Encyclopedia of Mytholingual Creatures, Places, and Things—Part I; by Jʚsɘph Cɑɱpbɛɬɭ; From Volume CLIX, Number 2 of Speculative Grammarian, June 2010. — Abominable Synonym: A mytholingual creature of Nepal and Tibet that causes speakers within the radius of its effect to pathologically doubt their ability to choose the right word. (Read by Trey Jones.)

  • Phonological Theory and Language Acquisition

    Phonological Theory and Language Acquisition

    15/08/2010 Duración: 02min

    Phonological Theory and Language Acquisition; by Notker Balbulus, Monastery of St. Gall; From Volume CXLVIII, Number 2, of Speculative Grammarian, January 1998. — Gildea has argued that modern phonological theorizing suffers from a tendency toward over application of a particular insight. That is, a particular theory is developed to deal with a particular sort of problem, which it handles well. However, the theory's creators, emboldened by their success, and eager to win a Kuhnian victory over their rivals, then start applying the theory willy-nilly to areas for which it is not well-suited. (Read by David J. Peterson.)

  • Morphemes: A New Threat to Society

    Morphemes: A New Threat to Society

    15/07/2010 Duración: 02min

    Morphemes: A New Threat to Society; by Susan Wishnetsky; From Lingua Pranca, June 1978. — This leaflet was produced by the Council On Morpheme Abuse (COMA) to increase public awareness of the most recent health hazards. (Read by Trey Jones.)

  • How to Do Fieldwork on Proto-Indo-European

    How to Do Fieldwork on Proto-Indo-European

    15/06/2010 Duración: 17s

    How to Do Fieldwork on Proto-Indo-European; by Tim Pulju, Dartmouth College; From Volume CLVIII, Number 4 of Speculative Grammarian, April 2010 (Read by David J. Peterson.)

  • New speech disorder linguists contracted discovered!

    New speech disorder linguists contracted discovered!

    15/06/2010 Duración: 41s

    New speech disorder linguists contracted discovered!; by Yreka Bakery, Egello College; From Volume CLI, Number 2 of Speculative Grammarian, April 2006. — An apparently new speech disorder a linguistics department our correspondent visited was affected by has appeared. Those affected our correspondent a local grad student called could hardly understand apparently still speak fluently. (Read by Jouni Filip Maho.)

  • Subliminal Linguistics

    Subliminal Linguistics

    15/06/2010 Duración: 01min

    Subliminal Linguistics; By Trey Jones, at Rice University; From Volume CXLVII, Number 2, of Speculative Grammarian, February 1993. — The new field of subliminal linguistics questions whether or not it is possible that there are clues available to children for language acquisition which are not obvious to those who study the process, and which may occur below the level of conscious recognition, but nonetheless aid language acquisition. (Read by Trey Jones.)

  • What is Linguistics Good For, Anyway?

    What is Linguistics Good For, Anyway?

    16/05/2010 Duración: 06min

    What is Linguistics Good For, Anyway?; An Advice Column by Jonathan “Crazy Ivan” van der Meer; From Volume CLV, Number 4 of Speculative Grammarian, February 2009. — The most commonly asked question of a linguist, when one’s secret is revealed, is (all together now!): “How many languages do you speak?” I’ve decided that a good answer to this question is π. More than three, less than four—though if you discover that your interlocutor is singularly unsophisticated or otherwise from Kansas, you can call it three to keep things simple. (Read by David J. Peterson.)

  • The Braille Song

    The Braille Song

    15/04/2010 Duración: 03min

    The Braille Song; by Innocuous Mustard; Music and Lyrics by Sheri Wells-Jensen, Sam Herrington, and Jason Wells-Jensen; From Volume CLVIII, Number 1 of Speculative Grammarian, January 2010. — You can read it in the sunshine, / Standin’ in the lunch line, / Under cover after bedtime: Braille, Braille, Braille.

  • The Boustrophedon-Plummerfeld Hypothesis and Futurological Linguistics

    The Boustrophedon-Plummerfeld Hypothesis and Futurological Linguistics

    15/03/2010 Duración: 05min

    The Boustrophedon-Plummerfeld Hypothesis and Futurological Linguistics; by Jay Trones; From Volume CXLVII, Number 2 of Speculative Grammarian, February 1993. — Recently I found myself "fortunate enough to find such occasion" (Pyles & Algeo, P.46) as to weasel the word 'boustrophedon' into a conversation. After having expounded on the many joyous properties of this word, I entreated my fellow conversational participant to remember the word, and attempt to become one of those few and proud who have used it casually in non-academia. In a subsequent discourse with my native English speaking informant, I asked her to recall the illustrious word. Her response was 'plummerfeld'. (Read by Josephine Whitford.)

  • The Tribesman

    The Tribesman

    15/02/2010 Duración: 04min

    The Tribesman; by Aya Katz & Leslie Fish; From Volume CXLVII, Number 1 of Speculative Grammarian, January 1993 —— Once a fieldworker hiked into unknown terrain, / Seeking someone to question, he came. / When he asked of the natives what language they spoke / There was one who was glad to explain. / Behind lay a linguist, as well as a saint, / Who would translate the Bible for them. / Would decipher the code of their language so quaint, / And secure for himself lasting fame. (Performed by Leslie Fish.)

  • A 21st Century Proposal for English Spelling Reform

    A 21st Century Proposal for English Spelling Reform

    15/01/2010 Duración: 07min

    A 21st Century Proposal for English Spelling Reform; by H. Sanderson Chambers III; From Volume CXLIX, Number 2 of Speculative Grammarian, January 2004. — As is well-known to all educated people—and if it’s not well-known to you, then you’re not one of us—the early part of the 20th century was the heyday of the Simplified Spelling movement, which sought to reform English spelling on the grounds that it was “mard by absurdities and inconsistencies”. So what, you might say? Well, among other things, the simplifiers claimed that the spelling system kept English from being adopted as an international language: “A language, in which to learn to spel imperfectly takes two ful years of scool-time in the countries where it is spoken, does not recommend itself to the forener as a convenient medium for conducting his relations with other foreners”. (Read by David J. Peterson.)

  • Reanalysis of Spanish by Naïve Linguists

    Reanalysis of Spanish by Naïve Linguists

    15/12/2009 Duración: 04min

    Reanalysis of Spanish by Naïve Linguists; by Chesterton Wilburfors Gilchrist, Jr.; From Volume CLV, Number 1 of Speculative Grammarian, September 2008. — While sitting in the Linguistics Lounge the other day, I overheard some first-year grad students discussing the day’s Spanish class. My eavesdropping turned out to be much more interesting than I had anticipated. (Read by Trey Jones.)

  • Nasal-Ingressive Voiceless Velar Trill (Letters to the Editor)

    Nasal-Ingressive Voiceless Velar Trill (Letters to the Editor)

    01/12/2009 Duración: 01min

    Letters to the Editor; From Volume CLI, Number 3 of Speculative Grammarian, July 2006. — To the most respected editors, In the fall I’ll be a first-year grad student in linguistics at R—— University. A couple of the current fourth-years told me that the International Phonetic Association was adding several new symbols for sounds that have previously been considered to have questionable status as phonemes. They said that the most contentious new addition was double-dot wide-O, a nasal-ingressive voiceless velar trill. (Read by Declan Whitford Jones and Trey Jones.)

  • Where No Researcher Should Tread

    Where No Researcher Should Tread

    01/12/2009 Duración: 07min

    Where No Researcher Should Tread; By Cowell R. Augh, Ph.D.; From Volume CLVI, Number 3 of Speculative Grammarian, May 2009. — We, the linguistic community at large, owe a great deal of thanks to our esteemed colleague Quentin Popinjay Snodgrass for alerting us to the dangers of lexicalism. A hero of his stature doesn’t come along every day, and it would be wise of us to pay close attention to his advice—and, may I say, it is my general belief that many of us have done just that. There are those, however, who either remain ignorant of the horrors of lexicalism, or deny its ability to corrupt the minds of students and academics alike. “Everyone in my department abhors lexicalist theories of grammar!” chortles John T. Department Chair. “Why should I remain on guard?” In times of war (for, realistically, what is this if not warfare?), though, one must be prepared for anything—especially when the enemy appears in the guise of an ally: language itself! (Read by David J. Peterson.)

  • The Effect of Coffee Consumption on Adults Average MLU

    The Effect of Coffee Consumption on Adults' Average MLU

    01/12/2009 Duración: 03min

    The Effect of Coffee Consumption on Adults’ Average MLU at the Breakfast Table; By Suzy X.; From Volume XVI, Number 3 of Psammeticus Quarterly, May 1989. — Dear Sirs: When Mommy fell asleep at the computer during her third straight all-nighter and accidentally erased her doctoral thesis, I wrote this to help her out. She graduated with honors, and so I thought I’d do a paper on it and send it to you, since I’ve heard it’s your kind of thing. Please do not print my full name with this article, because I am not allowed to use Mommy’s computer at all. Thanks, Suzy X. (Read by Mairead Whitford Jones, with Declan Whitford Jones, Joey Whitford, and Trey Jones.)

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