The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

Sinopsis

The Guardian's Audio Long Reads podcasts are a selection of the  Guardians long read articles which are published in the paper and online. It gives you the opportunity to get on with your day whilst listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer: in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more.

Episodios

  •  How rescuing drowning migrants became a crime

    How rescuing drowning migrants became a crime

    12/10/2020 Duración: 35min

    The Iuventa ran hundreds of missions to save migrants from drowning off the coast of Libya. But after Europe cracked down on migration, its crew found themselves facing prosecution. By Daniel Trilling. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  I dont want to be seen as a zealot: what MPs really think about the climate crisis

    'I don't want to be seen as a zealot': what MPs really think about the climate crisis

    09/10/2020 Duración: 26min

    In return for anonymity, MPs agreed to speak candidly about climate change. The difference between what they say in private and in public is striking – and shows us how we can make climate action central to post-pandemic politics. By Rebecca Willis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: The simple idea that could transform US criminal justice

    From the archives: The simple idea that could transform US criminal justice

    07/10/2020 Duración: 41min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: Judge Victoria Pratt looks defendants in the eye, asks them to write essays about their goals, and applauds them for complying – and she is getting results. By Tina Rosenberg. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The battle over dyslexia

    The battle over dyslexia

    05/10/2020

    It was once a widely accepted way of explaining why some children struggled to read and write. But in recent years, some experts have begun to question the existence of dyslexia itself. By Sirin Kale. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Fashions dirty secret: how sexual assault took hold in jeans factories

    Fashion's dirty secret: how sexual assault took hold in jeans factories

    02/10/2020 Duración: 28min

    After revelations of sexual violence in Lesotho garment factories, where jeans are made for brands such as Levi’s, workers fought for better conditions. But now Covid-19 has hit the fashion industry, those gains may be lost. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: The sugar conspiracy

    From the archives: The sugar conspiracy

    30/09/2020 Duración: 46min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long? By Ian Leslie. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  How philanthropy benefits the super-rich

    How philanthropy benefits the super-rich

    28/09/2020 Duración: 29min

    There are more philanthropists than ever before. Each year they give tens of billions to charitable causes. So how come inequality keeps rising?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The butchers shop that lasted 300 years (give or take)

    The butcher's shop that lasted 300 years (give or take)

    25/09/2020 Duración: 39min

    Frank Fisher, now 90, was a traditional high street butcher his whole working life – as were three generations of his family before him. How does a man dedicated to serving his community decide when it’s time to hang up his white coat? By Tom Lamont. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: How Boots went rogue

    From the archives: How Boots went rogue

    23/09/2020 Duración: 47min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: Britain’s biggest pharmacy used to be a family business, dedicated to serving society. Now, many of the company’s own staff believe that its relentless drive for profit is putting the public at risk. By Aditya Chakrabortty. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Life after deportation: No one tells you how lonely youre going to be

    Life after deportation: 'No one tells you how lonely you're going to be'

    21/09/2020 Duración: 24min

    The Windrush scandal brought the cruelty of Britain’s deportation policies to light, but the practice continues to this day – and shockingly, it is made possible by UK aid money. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Operation Condor: the cold war conspiracy that terrorised South America

    Operation Condor: the cold war conspiracy that terrorised South America

    18/09/2020 Duración: 40min

    During the 1970s and 80s, eight US-backed military dictatorships jointly plotted the cross-border kidnap, torture, rape and murder of hundreds of their political opponents. Now some of the perpetrators are finally facing justice. By Giles Tremlett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: Tudormania: Why can’t we get over it?

    From the archives: Tudormania: Why can’t we get over it?

    16/09/2020 Duración: 32min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week’s article: Our fixation with the sexy powerplays of the Tudor court shows no signs of fading. What is it about this 16th-century dynasty that still obsesses us? By Charlotte Higgins. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Escape: the woman who brought her trafficker to justice

    Escape: the woman who brought her trafficker to justice

    14/09/2020 Duración: 32min

    Thousands of young women leave home in Nigeria every year on the promise of a good job in Europe, only to be trapped by debt and forced into prostitution. But one joined forces with investigators in Italy to expose the traffickers. By Ottavia Spaggiari. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Love you to death: how we hurt the animals we cherish

    Love you to death: how we hurt the animals we cherish

    11/09/2020 Duración: 24min

    Something has gone badly wrong with the way we keep pets. Our casual cruelties are a symptom of our unhealthy relationship with other species. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: The fortune-teller of Kabul

    From the archives: The fortune-teller of Kabul

    09/09/2020 Duración: 38min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: For centuries mystics have channelled the hopes and fears of Afghans. With the nation in turmoil, their services are as popular as ever. But can they survive the latest crackdown by religious hardliners?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The tyranny of chairs: why we need better design

    The tyranny of chairs: why we need better design

    07/09/2020 Duración: 28min

    Most chairs aren’t designed to serve human bodies – but a better seat is possible. By Sara Hendren. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Americas untouchables: the silent power of the caste system

    America's 'untouchables': the silent power of the caste system

    04/09/2020 Duración: 22min

    We cannot fully understand the current upheavals, or almost any turning point in American history, without accounting for the human pyramid that is encrypted into us all: the caste system. By Isabel Wilkerson. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  From the archives: The birth of Rhodes Must Fall

    From the archives: The birth of Rhodes Must Fall

    02/09/2020 Duración: 39min

    We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2015: When a black South African student threw a bucket of excrement over a statue of Cecil Rhodes, it kicked off a protest movement that is shattering the way the country sees its past. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  Decolonising dermatology: why black and brown skin need better treatment

    Decolonising dermatology: why black and brown skin need better treatment

    31/08/2020 Duración: 28min

    During my medical training, it was almost always assumed that my patients would be white. That prejudice is harmful in its own right – and when it comes to dangerous skin conditions, it can be deadly. By Neil Singh. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

  •  The business of kidnapping: inside the secret world of hostage negotiation

    The business of kidnapping: inside the secret world of hostage negotiation

    28/08/2020 Duración: 27min

    Official policy in the UK and US – unlike in many other countries – is to never make concessions to kidnappers. Those taken sometimes die as a result. Is it time to rethink? By Joel Simon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

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