Bionic Planet: Your Guide To The New Reality

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Sinopsis

Earth. We broke it; we own it; and nothing is as it was: not the trees, not the seas not the forests, farms, or fields and not the global economy that depends on all of these. Bionic Planet is your guide to the Anthropocene, the new epoch defined by man's impact on Earth, and in each episode, we examine a different aspect of this new reality: sometimes financial, sometimes moral, but always practical.

Episodios

  • Forests, Fires, and Jurisdictional Offsets: A Conversation with Naomi Swickard of Verra

    Forests, Fires, and Jurisdictional Offsets: A Conversation with Naomi Swickard of Verra

    01/05/2020 Duración: 53min

    Global greenhouse-gas emissions will drop 5.5 percent this year because of COVID-19, but they must drop 7.6 percent every year to meet the Paris Agreement's 1.5C target. Forest carbon offsets provide one way of getting there fast, but can we trust these offsets? Do they do what they say they do? This week, we hear how the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) handles carbon accounting at different scales. And my guest, Naomi Swickard, actually makes it interesting.

  • 057 | COVID-19 and the Value of Resilience over Efficiency

    057 | COVID-19 and the Value of Resilience over Efficiency

    01/04/2020 Duración: 16min

    When US President Donald Trump disbanded his country's pandemic response team, he did so because "I don't like having thousands of people around when we don't need them." That cost-cutting measure could cost hundreds of thousands of lives, and it's a classic example of what happens when we value efficiency over resilience.  What are efficiency and resilience? Today we draw on the work of Cardiff University Lecturer Paul Nieuwenhuis to find out.

  • 056 | How Costa Rica Grew Both its Forests and its Economy

    056 | How Costa Rica Grew Both its Forests and its Economy

    24/02/2020 Duración: 22min

    Costa Rica says it will have zero net greenhouse-gas emissions by 2050, and its electrical grid already runs on 99 percent renewable energy. Today's guest is a key part of its success. As Minister of Environment, Energy and Telecommunications,  Carlos Manuel Rodriguez has overseen programs that tripled the country's forest coverage while slashing its use of fossil fuels -- all while growing its economy.

  • 055 | The Citizens Climate Lobby Wants to Spread the Carbon Wealth

    055 | The Citizens Climate Lobby Wants to Spread the Carbon Wealth

    13/02/2020 Duración: 01h22min

    Today's guest, Daniel Palken, volunteers with a group called the Citizens Climate Lobby, or "CCL", which aims to slash US greenhouse-gas emissions by imposing a fee on fossil fuels. The fee will be based on the amount of greenhouse gas that the coal, gasoline, and jet fuels will generate when we burn them, and it will probably make fossil-fuel energy more expensive. But there's a catch -- or, the opposite of a catch... a bonus -- a dividend, if you will, because that's what CCL calls it. Under the proposed "Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act," all money raised by the carbon fee will go back to US citizens in the form of a dividend. We each pay into the system based on how much energy we use -- whether in the form of an extra few cents at the pump or slightly higher groceries -- but every single citizen gets the same dividend back. A fee-and-dividend system is different from the cap-and-trade programs that I usually focus on, for lots of reasons we get into. Daniel says that a fee-and-dividend scenario

  • 054 | Twenty Countries Can Soon Absorb More Greenhouse Gas Than They Emit

    054 | Twenty Countries Can Soon Absorb More Greenhouse Gas Than They Emit

    01/02/2020 Duración: 50min

    Developing countries are the most vulnerable to – and least responsible for – climate change, but new research shows that some of them can dramatically boost their economies by managing their forests, farms, and fields in ways that pull greenhouse gasses from the atmosphere.   At a carbon price of $50 for every metric ton of CO2 removed from the atmosphere, for example, Costa Rica can go beyond net-zero and end up pulling four times as much greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere as its entire economy emits right now. At that same carbon price, the Central African Republic can use NCS strategies to boost its GDP a staggering 90 percent. Different Countries; Different Scenarios Authored by scientists from 17 organizations, the new paper looks at 12 natural climate solutions across 79 tropical countries and identifies activities that can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 6.6 billion metric tons per year – ore more than all of the emissions generated by the United States – at a price of $50 per ton or lower. “W

  • 53: A Marshall Plan for Forests, with Charlotte Streck of Climate Focus

    53: A Marshall Plan for Forests, with Charlotte Streck of Climate Focus

    02/12/2019 Duración: 37min

    There's a lot of money sloshing around forests, and most of it goes into agricultural subsidies and investments that destroy forests, while only a trickle goes into programs that save them. That's why today's guest, Charlotte Streck, wants to implement a Marshall Plan for Forests.

  • 52: Natural Climate Solutions Explained (ENCORE PRESENTATION)

    52: Natural Climate Solutions Explained (ENCORE PRESENTATION)

    01/12/2019 Duración: 40min

    On the eve of year-end climate talks in Madrid, I revisit my 2017 conversation with Bronson Griscom, Director of Forest Carbon Science for the Nature Conservancy.  He headed up a team of three dozen researchers from almost two dozen institutions tasked with identifying once and for all the realistic potential of using nature as a bulwark against climate change.  The result is a report called "Natural Climate Solutions", which identifies 20 low-cost, natural "pathways" that can get us 37 percent of the way to meeting the Paris Climate Agreement targets -- sometimes at no cost, sometimes at just $10 per ton, and often while increasing food yields and reducing the cost of farming.

  • 051 | Forests in the Paris Agreement: a Conversation with Annie Petsonk of EDF

    051 | Forests in the Paris Agreement: a Conversation with Annie Petsonk of EDF

    16/09/2019 Duración: 48min

    The third episode of our three-part look at the birth of REDD+, we speak with Annie Petsonk of the Environmental Defense Fund. Related Articles:   “Shades of REDD+: A Marshall Plan for Tropical Forests?” Link: https://www.ecosystemmarketplace.com/articles/shades-of-redd-a-marshall-plan-for-tropical-forests/   “Forests, Farms, and the Global Carbon Sink: The Genesis” Link: https://www.ecosystemmarketplace.com/articles/forests-farms-global-carbon-sink-genesis/

  • 050| Forests in the Paris Climate Agreement, Part 2: The Birth of REDD+

    050| Forests in the Paris Climate Agreement, Part 2: The Birth of REDD+

    22/08/2019 Duración: 56min

    In this second part of our three-part series on the history of forests in the Paris Climate Agreement, we hear how REDD+ got its name and made its way into the climate negotiations. Special Guest: Kevin Conrad of the Coalition for Rainforest Nations

  • 049 | Forests in the Paris Climate Agreement, Part 1: The Birth of Forest Carbon

    049 | Forests in the Paris Climate Agreement, Part 1: The Birth of Forest Carbon

    15/08/2019 Duración: 36min

    2019 is shaping up to be a pivotal summer in a pivotal year in the critical race to meet the climate challenge, with major media finally discovering the role that healthy forests can play in fixing the mess. In this episode, we examine the 40-year effort to slow climate change by saving forests. It's the first of three parts developed in accompaniment with the Ecosystem Marketplace series "Forests, Farms, and the Global Carbon Sink: It’s Happening" Guest: Kevin Conrad, Coalition for Rainforest Nations  

  • 048: Understanding the IPCC’s New Compendium of Science on Climate, Forests, and Farms

    048: Understanding the IPCC’s New Compendium of Science on Climate, Forests, and Farms

    10/08/2019 Duración: 17min

    We eat to live, but the food we’re eating is killing us – not just because of what it does to our bodies, but because of what it does to our climate. Beef, for example, comes from cows that burp out methane, which is a powerful greenhouse gas that traps up to 80-times more heat than carbon dioxide does, and we often chop carbon-absorbing forests to graze those methane-emitting cows, only to throw away one-third of all the food we produce. If there are two things scientists who study this stuff agree on, it’s that we can slow climate change by eating less meat and wasting less food, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) new Special Report on Climate Change and Land (SRCCL), which was published this morning in Geneva.

  • 047 | An Accountability Framework For Deforestation

    047 | An Accountability Framework For Deforestation

    18/06/2019 Duración: 45min

    Environmental NGOs have long pressured companies to reduce their impact on forests, and companies have long complained that every NGO seems to come with different demands. Now a coalition of more than a dozen NGOs have called the corporate bluff by creating a framework that provides a universal way of accounting for deforestation. They call it the Accountability Framework, and today's guest, Jeff Milder, is one of the people helping to pull it together.

  • 46| Restoration Economy, Part Two: The Billion-Dollar Foot

    46| Restoration Economy, Part Two: The Billion-Dollar Foot

    30/04/2019 Duración: 01h13min

    It's an article of faith among some on the left that markets and capitalism are the roots of all evil, while some on the right see pure, free markets as the invisible hand of God, and regulation as the work of the Devil. Most economists will tell you they're both wrong, because there's no such thing as either a pure free market or a marketless society. We need markets to get things done, and we need governance to keep markets honest.  That's especially true in environmental markets, which almost always exist because of laws that require people to clean up their messes or reduce their pollution. To slow climate change, for example, we have to put a cap on greenhouse-gas emissions, but how do we meet that cap? There are basically two ways. In command-and-control, a regulator writes up detailed, step-by-step prescriptions that have to be followed to the letter. In cap-and-trade, which is a market-based mechanism, emitters find their own way of meeting the cap, and they're allowed to sell emission-reductions to o

  • 045 | Nature, Paid on Delivery with Guest Tim Male

    045 | Nature, Paid on Delivery; with Guest Tim Male

    01/04/2019 Duración: 55min

    Environmental scientist Tim Male has worked the conservation puzzle from both the NGO and governmental sector -- first with NGOs like Environmental Defense Fund, then as an elected councilman, and finally as an adviser to the Obama Administration's Council on Environmental Quality. In 2017, he distilled his views in a paper called "Nature, Paid on Delivery", which examines the ways the US states of Louisiana, Maryland, California and Nevada are restoring large swathes of degraded land with only small amounts of taxpayer money being paid up-front. Can Pay for Success work in ecological restoration?

  • 044 | Green New Deal Architect Rhiana Gunn-Wright

    044 | Green New Deal Architect Rhiana Gunn-Wright

    18/03/2019 Duración: 34min

    We've been fairly US-centric lately, but only because so much is finally happening there. In today's episode, we speak with Rhiana Gunn-Wright of New Consensus. That's the Think Tank that's helping freshman Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and veteran Senator Ed Markey develop policy to support the Green New Deal they proposed last month.

  • 043 | Bees Trees and Burning Bluffs

    043 | Bees Trees and Burning Bluffs

    06/03/2019 Duración: 29min

    We're losing pollinators at an alarming rate, which scientists attribute at least in part to the loss of native plants, which evolved alongside hundreds of native pollinators -- including bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies.   Dave Neu and Joe Krischon of the Conservation Land Stewardship have been helping to resurrect a degraded ravine north of Chicago, and today they explain how this backbreaking work helps revive colonies of bees and butterflies, and how you, too, can join the restoration economy.

  • 042: (Adapted Encore) Donald Trumps Dirty Water Rule

    042: (Adapted Encore) Donald Trump's Dirty Water Rule

    01/03/2019 Duración: 56min

    Wetlands cover 274 million acres of the United States, and they ultimately provide more than half the country's drinking water, which is one reason the federal government protects them -- or has, until now. Back in December, the US EPA and Army corps of engineers unveiled new rules for regulating water, and you'd be surprised what it leaves out. More half of the country's wetlands will no longer have federal protection, and neither will so-called "ephemeral streams", that only flow in certain conditions.  As of February 15, the public has 60 days to comment on the rule, so I'm running this piece I posted way back in August. If you're a paying patron, you will not be charged for this, and if you're not a patron, I invite you to become one at bionic-planet.com or at patreon.com/bionic planet. I planned this piece as a two-parter, but haven't delivered the second half yet because I couldn't afford to, and that's a fact. These packages, with multiple voices and tons of research take a lot of work, and I've got a

  • 041: ENCORE PRESENTATION: Why the Sustainable Development Goals Really Are a Very Big Bid Deal

    041: ENCORE PRESENTATION: Why the Sustainable Development Goals Really Are a Very Big Bid Deal

    15/02/2019 Duración: 34min

    We hear a lot about the Sustainable Development Goals, or "SDGs" these days, with major pension funds like Calvert aligning their portfolios with them, and up to $12 trillion in finance, by one estimate, ready to do the same the same. But what are they? That's a question I tried answering almost three years ago -- way back in 2016. It was right after world leaders had reached the Paris Climate Agreement, and right before my fellow countrymen shot the world in the butt by electing Donald Trump as President of the United States. This encore presentation looks at the Sustainable Development Goals -- the SDGs -- which are more important now than ever -- and I think today's show, even though it's almost three years old, is more relevant than ever, too.  That's because it looks at the SDGs in the context of the global institutions that emerged from the ashes of World War II, and that Donald Trump, Vladmir Putin, and the Koch Brothers, among a whole bunch of other miscreants, are trying to destroy. We're a big, dive

  • 40 | Former Climate Boss Yvo de Boer

    40 | Former Climate Boss Yvo de Boer

    23/01/2019 Duración: 01h22min

    Yvo de Boer served as Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) from August, 2006 to July, 2010; and in November of last year, he became president of the Gold Standard, which is an NGO-led global partnership that sets standards for everything from carbon projects to the way we recognize contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) In this wide-ranging discussion, we discuss everything from the outcome of the most recent talks in Katowice to the odd phenomenon of explosive chickens -- as well as how we can quantify the impact that countries and companies have on achieving the SDGs.  

  • 39 | How Worlds Farmers are Engaging the Global Climate Apparatus

    39 | How World's Farmers are Engaging the Global Climate Apparatus

    24/12/2018 Duración: 51min

    Agriculture emits roughly 20 percent of all greenhouse gasses, but sustainable management of forests, farms, and fields can turn the world's farms into massive carbon sinks that absorb greenhouse gasses by the gigaton, yet farmers -- as opposed to agriculture ministers -- have been nearly invisible at year-end climate talks. That changed this past year, thanks to a global farmer-led effort to promote climate-safe agriculture and the emergence of the Koronivia joint Working Group on Agriculture, which creates a fast track for integrating agriculture into the Paris Climate Agreement. Today's guest, Fred Yoder, is an Ohio family farmer who has become a leading proponent of climate-safe agriculture within the Americas. He tells us how farmers moved from the fringes to the center of climate negotiations in just two short years. Also appearing: Ceris Jones, Theo de Jager, Tonya Rawe, and Jason Funk

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